What is an Everyday 'Compostable' Consumer Product?


What is an Everyday 'Compostable' Consumer Product?

Compost is “a mixture of decayed or decaying organic matter used to fertilize soil. Compost is usually made by gathering plant material, such as leaves, grass clippings, and vegetable peels, into a pile or bin and letting it decompose as a result of the action of aerobic bacteria, fungi, and other organisms”1.

A compostable consumer product is fully or predominantly made of organic matter.  After the end of life or use of an everyday compostable consumer product, it can be thrown in with the rest of your compost, ready for immediate biological decomposition and have it return back to earth.

How is this different from a Biodegradable product? Products that are biodegradable, unless recycled, are picked up as regular trash and thrown into landfills to allow for longer-term bio-degradation to occur.  Also, consider the added carbon footprint that goes into the process of picking up trash and taking them into landfills.

However, it’s not necessarily the case that Compostable is better than Biodegradable products, but owning and using compostable product is another alternative to align with eco living.

If you’re interested in using compostable alternatives, why not start with everyday products, such as straws and toothbrushes, which are high contributors to the plastic problem.

Products we currently have that are compostable are Bamboo Straws and handles of our Bamboo Toothbrushes.  

After half a year or less of use, our drinking bamboo straws can simply be thrown into the compost bin and you will literally ‘give back’ to the earth.  

As for our toothbrushes, carefully break off the bristled part and throw that into the trash, and then place the handle in the compost bin

Did you know Plastic Straws and Toothbrushes2 are everyday products that poison our planet?  Now you know. So go make a difference and get your own compostable product today!

With love and compassion,

Team Karunaki

1Source for Definition of Compost
2Source from YPWF
Top Photo by Eddie Kopp on Unsplash